Context clues that a series is in the works

swetergrl86:

7 years later and every time I read this, I think “Nailed It!” Every one of these has come to pass. Series continue to be the hot format this last decade. Not all of them are good, though. In fact, it’s fair to say that there’s a glut of series in the market now. Romance writing tends to go from glut to glut, have you noticed? What will be the next trend after series? Also, the whole alpha male thing is glutted, as well. The next trend would have to be antithetic — like nerds in love or something.

  1. the hero/heroine has lots of close friends/relatives who figure prominently in the story
  2. comments about friends’/relatives’ love lives are interspersed throughout the story
  3. sometime during the story, a gauntlet is thrown down about how the F/R will fare when they (3a) meet their soul mate; (3b) meet their match
  4. F/R declares that they will never fall in love then become sappy and swoony about it
  5. F/R declares that they want someone completely different from the person their friend fell in love with
  6. F/Rs of hero/heroine are thrown together
  7. F/Rs of hero/heroine have a history
  8. F/R is due to do business with someone who will turn out to be a love interest
  9. hero/heroine inform on one F/R to another F/R
  10. hero/heroine take on yenta duties
  11. an elder character or authority figure character takes on yenta duties

 

Originally posted on The Festering Blurb:Bursting Open w/Pungent Prose:

 
 
 

 

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WEB NOVELAS — FANFICTION IN SPANISH

swetergrl86:

William Levy is making his way in the world. He lives in Miami. He’s starred in an American B-list motion picture, a couple of tv shows, and his biggest American hit so far — Dancing With The Stars. He was the only reason that I watched that show. Haven’t looked at it since. He and his partner got 3rd, I think. It’s all over the YouTubes.
This is a popular post, which is why I’m re-blogging it. His best telenovelas have been Cuidado Con El Angel and Sortilegio. The rest are pure rubbish ( La Tempestad, Triunfo del Amor). There are older ones — Pasion, Accoralada, and Olvidarte Jamas. There’s so much of him to watch. Not like Travis Fimmel — whom I love, but had to wait for years after WB’s Tarzan for something of his to watch.
William is on Facebook and Twitter.

Originally posted on The Festering Blurb:Bursting Open w/Pungent Prose:

 

All of these are related to Cuban telenovela superstar superhunk <<Guapisimo Mangote>>   If the heroine is Jacqueline Bracamontes who was his co-star in SORTILEGIO, then that’s a “Levymontes” story. Geddit???  If the heroine is Maite Perroni who was his co-star in CUIDADO CON EL ANGEL, then it’s a “Levyrroni” story.  Personally, I prefer Bracamontes, whom I call…

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ELIZABETH LOWELL’S MACKENZIE-BLACKTHORN SERIES — EARLY 90s

swetergrl86:

This post has been getting a lot of attention lately. I don’t know why, but I’m guessing that readers are looking for intel on the character of Utah Blackthorn. Sadly, there will be no Utah story. That ship has sailed. Boo.

Originally posted on The Festering Blurb:Bursting Open w/Pungent Prose:

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Granite Man

 3 Elizabeth Lowell paperback WESTERN FRONTIER book set: WARRIOR / OUTLAW / and RECKLESS LOVE There’s no story for the third Blackthorn brother, Utah.

Just a note to the sisterhood of serious collectors: none of the covers pictured above are the original covers except for Outlaw.  That’s a black-haired Fabio on the cover, btw.  It took me the better part of a year and a lot of driving around San Antonio to find original editions of the books. A first edition Silhouette Desire of Warrior I found on eBay just last year.  The rest I found at Half-Price Books and local used book sales back in the 90s.  So for about 4 years, I was steeping myself in westerns.  And I learned a lot about the lifestyle.  A bit like Little House on The Prairie with an adult conscience.

It’s been over 15 years since the first one, Reckless Love came out and first covers are getting harder and harder to find. F&R

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Connect with my Italy blog

http://bladon5330.blogspot.com/2014/07/watching-world-cup-in-santa-marinella.html

I’m writing a blog about a literature class I took in Italy.  Check it out. Frankly, it’s a miracle I got anything done once the World Cup started.

IMAG0046

First thing I saw as I walked out of the train station in Rome!

 

Harlequin Presents Class Reunion

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This reunion is made possible by WWW.PAPERBACKSWAP.COM.

Send a book; get a book. You only pay postage.  Paperbackswap is better than eBay for finding books that you’ve loved and lost. 

J0076175

With very little effort on my part (the best kind), I found several of my old Harlequin Present favorites from when I was young.  Wow, what a revelation to read them now.  I want to say that it’s a coincidence that the males are overbearing, arrogant, abusive, and violent, but that was de rigeur in 1970s romance.  So not so coincidental after all. 

The other element that ties these books to their times is that the men are wealthy owners of corporations.  The only variety that you see is with the female characters.  I hesitate to call them heroines because they are not heroic.  They are trying to not be bullied.  It’s easy to fight back when you are arguing with a hot guy.  Not so easy when hot guy starts kissing you.  How sad that the authors had so little sense of what makes a man.  The men are all little better than paper dolls, whereas the women undergo psychological overhauls of Shakespearean proportions.

 

Pagan Encounter
Charlotte Lamb
Pagan Encounter

Wilder Shore

Daphne Clair

A Wilder Shore

Portrait of Bethany (Castle, Bk 1) (Harlequin Presents, No 541)

Anne Weale

Portrait of Bethany

The Loving Trap (Harlequin Presents, No 506)

Daphne Clair

The Loving Trap


Rachel Lindsay
Forgotten Marriage

Mortimer, Carole - Lifelong Affair - Harlequin Presents - # 627

Carole Mortimer

Lifelong Affair

 

The Sea Master (Harlequin Presents, #512)
Sally Wentworth
The Sea Master

A Frozen Fire (Harlequin Presents, No 380)

Charlotte Lamb

A Frozen Fire

Charlotte Lamb
Sensation

Velvet Touch (Silhouette Desire, No 11)

Stephanie James

Velvet Touch

Make No Promises (Silhouette Desire, No 8)

Sherry Dee

Make No Promises

 

A Land Called Deseret (Harlequin Presents, No 326)

Janet Dailey

A Land Called Deseret

 

 

The one thing that ties the Presents together that I never could grasp is how the women could fall in love with men with whom they exchanged maybe a half dozen words and most of those barked by the men while the women were stunned into silence.  Even now, a couple of decades later, the logic of it still escapes me.  The guy is in absentia for a hundred pages but she falls in love with him.  He’s mean and judgmental, but he’s nice to his mom, so she falls in love with him.  How is that romantic???

And yet, these books are the ones I remembered 30-40 years later.  The “happiest” one has to be FROZEN FIRE.  A man and woman fall in love, but the woman’s married.  She sees how her husband is awful and the man she loves is wonderful.  It’s the most logical one of the bunch.  Everything in the plot makes sense and has a logical continuity.  A WILDER SHORE is #2 in the logical plot winners list.  It takes place over several years, but everything that happens is logical and even the problems make sense.

Sometimes it’s not the plot.  Sometimes I learn something.  I learned about Meissen porcelain from PAGAN ENCOUNTER.  When people were leaving Germany in 1939, they converted money to Meissen porcelain because it’s valuable and could easily be converted to cash outside the country. SENSATION would never have caught my interest if it had been set anywhere but Paris.  Seriously, that’s the only thing this story has going for it.  The story has a romantic plot – a man decides that he wants his wife to live with him after years of living apart.  But he was a bitch most of the time.  No innovation there.

THE SEA MASTER is older guy with older teen.  No big deal according to the writer’s logic.  Nowadays, it’s just icky.  The girl gets a hard lesson in growing up and not being so self-absorbed.  But not in a fun way.  There’s an unusual amount of housework.  The only reason I stuck with it is because it happens on a boat in the ocean.  It was super unusual for a commonwealth author to write anything about America.  A LAND CALLED DESERET is in the same vein as SEA MASTER – where the heroine learns to be a useful person instead of a pampered hothouse flower.  The hero is an inconceivable departure from the norm.  He’s a rancher, not wealthy, no luxury to speak of.  He’s more Elizabeth Lowell than Harlequin Presents.

I’ve mentioned before, I think, how Janet Dailey changed the playing field.  Most of the men in her Americana novels were not wealthy, but they were men of power or consequence.  She also introduced a more human, more gentle gentleman without the aristocratic arrogance that goes hand-in-hand with old money.  And let’s face it, you’re more likely to meet a Janet Dailey-type man than an Violet Winspear-type man or Carole Mortimer-type man.

It’s funny how I can get through the book in a few hours.  I spent way too much time as a teen reading these.  And now, it still takes me 3 or 4 hours to get through one.  I don’t rush. I like to enjoy certain scenes, the banter (such as it is).  For example, in A LAND CALLED DESERET, I like to read the references to the heroine’s “nice” cousin from A DANGEROUS MASQUERADE.  In fact, LaRaine Evans shows up an unprecedented 3! times in Dailey novels:  A DANGEROUS MASQUERADE, SONORA SUNDOWN, and DESERET.  Funny, though, when she showed up in SS, there was no indication that she would get her own novel.  Series were not the thing in the late 70s/early 80s.  And yet, again Dailey was at the forefront.  Her first Americana novel NO QUARTER ASKED had a sequel: FOR BITTER OR WORSE.  Then 1978’s THE MATCHMAKERS had a sequel – THAT CAROLINA SUMMER (1982).  Dailey was the queen!

No Quarter Asked (Harlequin Presents #124)         For Bitter or Worse (Harlequin Presents, No 267)

The Matchmakers (Harlequin Presents #264)       That Carolina Summer (Harlequin Presents, No 488)

LaRaine Evans Trio ~~~

      sonora sundown  (Harlequin Presents # 239)     A Land Called Deseret (Harlequin Presents, No 326)

Other scenes I liked:

In LIFELONG AFFAIR, I love the hero! He’s awesome.  Thank you to Carole Mortimer for keeping his arrogance tangible but not overwhelming, so that when Glenna fell in love with him, it was logical.  Suspension of disbelief is all well and good, but jeezy kreezy, you know what I mean!  A really good scene was when he and Glenna were in the honeymoon suite and he felt sheepish at being caught out – you know – in the “honeymoon” suite. Wink, wink, nudge. nudge!

THE LOVING TRAP reminds me of early Elizabeth Lowell Silhouette Desire novels – the heroine was psychologically scarred from a prior event and the insensitive man tries to get her past it – with mixed results.  A good scene from that one was when the hero gives the heroine a “Mr. Darcy”-style shite marriage proposal.  After he gets through explaining all the ways that she annoys him and confuses him, he’s all “marry me.”  And she’s all “okay.”  It’s kind of WTF, but I had gotten to like him by that time.

Some popular posts from the Romance category:

2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 3,500 times in 2013. If it were a cable car, it would take about 58 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Greeks party like it’s 193 CE

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THE LEARNED BANQUETERS BKS I-III.106e (Vol. 1)

This fun little volume is a catalog of the party habits of the ancient Greeks – probably around the first two hundred years of the Common Era.  It’s the single source of “over 10,000 lines of verse” and quotes from around 1000 authors – some familiar: Aristotle, Aristophanes, Euripides, Sophocles, and Homer.*  So many unfamiliar names are quoted or mentioned with lip-smacking, teeth-cracking abundance:

  • Astydamas
  • Theopompus
  • Hellanica
  • Agatharchides
  • Philomides
  • Xenophon
  • Cratinus
  • Thucydides
  • Philippedes
  • Mnesithius
  • Hermippus
  • Dichaearchus
  • Democritus

How funny that my spell-check only recognizes Xenophon, Democritus, and Thucydides out of this list.

The structure of the volume is similar to the Platonic dialogues.  Party guests represent different areas of knowledge or schools of thought.  Musicians talk about music.  Physicians talk about medicine.  Everybody talks gossip and WINE!  There’s wisecracks and sarcasm enough for a Friar’s Club roast.  Some guests represent social classes and some are real people.

Mundane and profane, chatty and catty, cynical and clinical. TLB is painfully detailed (or do I mean painstaking?).  Can you imagine a party where the host is entertaining experts in “every field of knowledge” at his pimped-out crib (to use a pimply adolescent hyperbole)!

From page 18 to about page 39, it’s like an episode of “Bizarre Foods—Ancient Greece.”  The early part of the book also details party protocols. How to entertain soldiers.  How to entertain politicians.  How to prepare seafood.  The temperaments of cooks.  There’s even ancient Greek charcuterie and canapes and bizarre cocktails.  For example, a guest named Nestor prepares some wine for another guest – Machaon – who’s been wounded.  Nestor sprinkles some cheese on the wine and drops an onion in it.  Just like those martinis that have a pearl onion! The cheese? Who can say. Nestor was trying to get him drunk.  Cheese coats your stomach and you can stomach more alcohol that way. Jus’ conjecture here.

At one of Homer’s parties, the women of the house have to bathe the guests.  Ugh! Was that a reality or just wishful thinking on Homer’s part?  (He’s a genius, not an angel.)

P. 63 shows us the words for meals according to Philemon and corroborated by Aeschylus in general terms:

  1. akratisma: early meals; breakfast
  2. ariston: evening meal
  3. hesperisma
  4. deipnon:  second course

Another Aeschylus-related version shows arista as breakfast, deipna as dinners, dorpa as suppers (a third course).

Homer calls the fourth meal deilinon, and it comes between ariston and deipnon.

There’s a bit more, but you can see how nitpicky the telling gets.  The book even goes into who eats sitting down, who eats reclining. nicknames for people who do particular tasks, like carving the meat and serving drinks.

Speaking of drinks! Oh Em Gee the catalogue of wines! How would you like to see a wine list with the type of wine, the region it comes from and it’s health effects. Whether it’s sweet or sour, pure or mixed with water.  Imagine seeing the word “diuretic” with ridiculous regularity when reading the wine list.  The exhaustive catalog even tells you which wines get you drunk fast, and which ones are good for your health.  It’s a looooooong section!  Again —  the word “diuretic” is mentioned A LOT!

I kid you not – a section on almonds and other assorted nuts. Their health benefits, roasted or green, disputed names for nuts; whose nuts are better; different ways of serving and eating nuts.

Water:  where the best water comes from; health benefits of water; water mixed with wine. The word “diuretic” is not mentioned as much as in the wine section.

Fruits and vegetables: where do the best fruits come from; disputed names of fruits; ideal cooking methods for fruits and veg; health benefits.

The last section of Book I (Proton Biblion) covers sea food.  I’m not to that part yet, but if it’s like the other sections, there will be a lot of quotes and nitpicky details.

When it comes to discussing a particular item, like almonds or water, several quotes about the item are reported, so you get a cocktail party perspective on whatever the Alpha-foodies are talking about.  Basically, ancient Greeks making small talk about food and drink, making wisecracks and good-natured insults.  There’s always a know-it-all and a smart-ass.  Everyone tossing in their two cents.  So even though it the text is fragmented, it still flows logically.  It seamlessly flows from one topic to another.  Before you know it, you’ve gone from hosting soldiers in your home to what to do with olive mash once you’ve extracted all the oil.

Now that I’ve got the gist of it, I don’t think I’m going to shell out for the other two volumes.  At the end of the day, it’s an entertaining read. It shows the ancient Greeks were very much like us when we gather over food and drink.

Other posts that mention Loeb Classics:

Nyah-Nyah  Bizarre Foods in Greece

*I am not hyperlinking these names because all you need to do is Google them and you get like a gazillion hits.

 

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